Archives for Engineering

Fake Russian Twitter accounts politicized discourse about vaccines

(University at Buffalo) Activity from phony Twitter accounts established by the Russian Internet Research Agency (IRA) between 2015 and 2017 may have contributed to politicizing Americans’ position on the nature and efficacy of vaccines, a health care topic which has not historically fallen along party lines, according to new research published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Original source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/uab-frt033120.php

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BIDMC physician-scientists spearhead effort to address COVID-19 testing swab shortage

(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, launched a collaborative and open-source effort to address the shortage of swabs that is hampering the nation’s ability to test for and track the spread of the virus. The team’s mission is to catalyze the development and clinical validation of novel designs for swabs for COVID-19 testing that can be manufactured quickly and in large numbers.

Original source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/bidm-bps033120.php

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Russian trolls on Twitter polarized vaccination during 2016 election cycle

(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) During the 2016 election cycle, politically polarizing tweets by Russian trolls about vaccination included pro- and anti-vaccination messages targeted at people with specific political inclinations through a nine different fake persona types, according to a new study. Now, as the nation deals with the coronavirus pandemic, the researchers raise concerns that such polarization potentially affects crisis communications and creates tensions, mistrust, and a lack of intention to comply with government health directives.

Original source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/appc-rto033120.php

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Artificial intelligence can help some businesses but may not work for others

(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) The temptation for businesses to use artificial intelligence and other technology to improve performance, drive down labor costs, and better the bottom line is understandable. But before pursuing automation that could put the jobs of human employees at risk, it is important that business owners take careful stock of their operations.

Original source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/rpi-aic033120.php

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Wearable strain sensor using light transmittance helps measure physical signals better

Researchers have developed a novel wearable strain sensor based on the modulation of optical transmittance of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-embedded elastomer. The sensor is capable of sensitive, stable, and continuous measurement of physical signals. This technology shows great potential for the detection of subtle human motions and the real-time monitoring of body postures for healthcare applications.

Original source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200323104151.htm

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